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Roberts Stream 67 Review

Roberts Stream 67 review: A smarter system for audio

Roberts Stream 67 Review
Release Date
2018
Manufacturer
Roberts
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I don’t know about you, but I’m a huge fan of Roberts Radio, and all of the incredible audio interfaces that they have to offer. Over the years, the company has accomplished amazing things time and time again in the radio landscape. Heck, there’s even a “Sports” version of the Roberts Radio available for people who like to stay connected to their favourite music, podcasts, and stations on the go.

The Roberts Stream 67 is just the latest in a selection of consistently wonderful products from the Roberts Radio brand. This state-of-the-art one-box solution to all your radio, streaming and CD listening needs looks and sounds just as good as anything else you’d find in the Roberts portfolio. Additionally, there are extra “smart features” included in this set that are sure to tempt you to make another purchase, even if you already have several Roberts radios at home.

Let’s take a closer look, shall we?

Roberts Stream 67 review: Design and build

Let’s start with one of the main components that has helped Roberts radios to stand out over the years – the design. As you can see, the Roberts Stream 67 maintains the same sophistication and elegance as other Roberts masterpieces. Although it’s not quite as “retro” in style as some of the other options on the market, like the Roberts Revival RD70, for instance, that doesn’t make it any less aesthetically pleasing.

I’m a massive fan of the combination of sleek black plastic and authentic wood that comes together to create this compelling radio. The multi-colour display is sure to capture your attention when you wake up to the sound of your alarm each morning, and the whole design is impressively heavy and tactile, so you feel like you’ve paid for something truly “premium” in nature.

While a weighty radio might not seem like a big deal at first, you’ll see what I mean when you take the Roberts Stream 67 out of the box. There’s something particularly sturdy about this set that makes it feel as though it’s worth every penny of its £600 price tag. It’s also worth noting that during my Roberts Streams 67 test, I noticed various connection options too, such as a Wi-Fi antenna, USB inputs, headphone output, and an ethernet connection.

The Stream 67 is also capable of tethering to any computer or NAS device also within your home broadband network and play the music you have stored in a range of file formats.

Roberts Stream 67 Review

Roberts Stream 67 review: Features

So, the Roberts Stream 67 looks good, and it definitely feels the part – but what can it actually do? Well, the simple answer is a lot. Aside from paying the music files that you already have access to, the Roberts will also give you access to internet radio, FM, and DAB. What’s more, the set comes with access to Tidal, Amazon Prime Music, Spotify Connect, and Deezer built-in.

Buy Guesswork by Lloyd Cole

If you don’t find the music streaming service you want on the Stream 67, you can use the Bluetooth connectivity to set your preferred software up on the system. There’s also the option to use your Stream 67 alongside Amazon Echo and Alexa products too, so you can control your content with just your voice. 

If you’re not interested in talking directly to your machines, then there’s a remote control included too, similar to the one that you’d get with the Stream 94i. The remote is actually quite robust, which makes a difference to a lot of the flimsy alternative remotes you get with radios from other providers. You can also adjust a wide variety of features using the Roberts Undok app too. Your options for customising your listening experience are practically endless.

Features include:

  • USB connectivity
  • Works with Alexa
  • Deezer, Tidal, Spotify, and Amazon Prime built-in
  • DAB, DAB+ and FM radio
  • Music player via network
  • CD, MP3, and WMA support
  • Third-party streaming service available
  • Remote control included
Roberts Stream 67 Review

Roberts Stream 67 review: Sound quality

Now, if you’re buying a radio from the Roberts brand, you’re going to expect an excellent variety of sound. Fortunately, the Roberts Stream 67 didn’t let me down in this area. Consistency in high-quality audio is a critical part of the Roberts brand, and you’re sure to enjoy plenty of warm, full-bodied tone no matter what you’re listening too. 

There’s plenty of bass to enjoy with the Stream 67, and the quality of the sound remains consistent even at louder volumes. The only slight downside with this set is that the forward-facing treble is slightly duller than it can be on other Roberts radios.

Ultimately, any audio issues with the Stream 67 will only capture the attention of the most discerning audiophiles. For the most part, you’re not going to notice any problems, and you can also adjust the sound quality using the app, control, or interface if you prefer.

Roberts Stream 67 Review
Roberts Stream 67 review: Verdict
Just like most of the beautiful products available from the Roberts Radio brand, you can expect nothing but amazing aesthetics and stunning sound from the Roberts Stream 67. It might not be the least expensive radio in the world, but it is one of the more intelligent and attractive options on the market today. That’s not to say that the Stream 67 is not without stiff completion from the likes of Revo and Ruark, but ultimately it justifies its price tag.
Sound
92
Design
94
Connectivity
95
Build quality
93
Positives
Beautiful design and robust presentation
Excellent audio quality for music and podcasts
Range of connectivity and playing options
High-quality materials used throughout
Remote control, Alexa control, and app control available
Negatives
Quite expensive for some buyers
Treble is a little dull in places
Stiff competition at this price point
94
Sweet
Where to buy
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